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prevention of food poisoning
catering services, Food Safety

Prevention Of Food Poisoning

Prevention Of Food Poisoning!!! 

Drawing attention to the recent unfortunate mass food poisoning onboard couple of vessels, leading to fatal deaths. This broadcast is to reiterate the importance of maintaining food safety on board and more importantly “always”.
Good food hygiene is more than cleanliness; it requires food to be protected from the risk of harmful contamination by bacteria, chemicals, and other foreign bodies from the point of delivery to point of consumption. Food must be protected against all forms of bad bacterial contamination. Hence, maintaining high standards of personal cleanliness and food safety is a must to start with. Any existing bacteria already in the food must be prevented from growing to dangerous levels. Most bacteria can be destroyed by thorough cooking (except pre-formed toxins).

prevention of food poisoningTo reduce the risk of food poisoning, the following control measures to be in place:

  • Personal hygiene.
  • Temperature control (keep food hot >63°C or cold <5°C).
  •  Segregation of raw and cooked foods.
  • Ensuring no risk of cross-contamination via hands, clothes, etc.
  •  Thorough cooking (cook to 70 Celsius for minimum 15 seconds).

To help stop bacteria from growing, please ensure the following:

  •  When the label says, ' keep refrigerated ' food must be stored in the fridge.
  •  Food should be cooked as near as possible to the time of meal service.
  •  Raw food must always be kept apart from cooked food.
  •  Separate refrigerators should be used for this purpose.
  •  All food in the refrigerator should be wrapped to prevent cross-contamination (SS container with lid/cling film/silver foil).
  •  Raw food (that often contains pathogenic bacteria) to be wrapped and placed at the bottom of the refrigerator (below-cooked food).
  •  Food should always be subjected to the least possible handling and full use is to be made of serving implements (tongs/spoons/ladles/food gloves).
  • Prepared dishes, such as meat, desserts with milk, egg, or cream ingredients must always be cooled as quickly as possible, covered, and refrigerated.
  • Food for cooking or service is to be covered and stowed in a refrigerator.
  • Butter and conserves for table use are to be similarly protected.
  • Flies and insects are carriers of disease and exposed food provides a serious threat to health. Newspaper / printed papers must not be used for food wrapping. Only grease-proof paper or a suitable food wrap should be used.
  • Food, when being transported, must be suitably covered. The suitable head covering must be always worn when working in a food preparation area/galley (head has the maximum bacteria on a person).
  • All fruit and salad items are to be thoroughly rinsed in freshwater prior to issue.
  • All dry provisions are to be stored in sealed bags or containers. This helps to keep them fresh and stops anything falling into the food by accident.
  • Do not store food items near cleaning chemicals (chemical contamination).
  • Do not use food containers to store cleaning chemicals or non-food for food.
  • Do not reuse plastic water bottles unless they are certified for the same.
  • Do not place or store food on the floor (even inside the storerooms/freezer), this will lead to contamination through pests or dirty liquids.
  • Maintain the required temperatures in all the storerooms.

Personal Hygiene

  • It is essential for food handlers to strictly practice high standards of personal cleanliness. They should be clean and tidy and wear suitable light-colored protective clothing.
  • There must be adequate hand washbasins with soap and drying facilities. Disposable towels or a hot air dryer only must be used and NOT a cloth towel (shared towels cause cross-contamination).

Hands and Arms Clean:

  •  Cleaning Procedures: Clean hands and exposed portions of your arms with a hand wash liquid by vigorously rubbing together for at least 20 seconds and thoroughly rinsing with clean water. Pay more attention to the areas underneath the fingernails and between the fingers.
  • When to Wash Hands: Clean your hands and exposed portions of your arms immediately before starting any kind of food preparation, including working with exposed food, clean equipment, and utensils.

1. After touching bare human body parts other than clean hands and clean exposed portions of arms. After using the toilet/restroom.
2. After coughing, sneezing, using a handkerchief or disposable tissue, using tobacco, eating, or drinking.
3. After handling soiled equipment or utensils. During food preparation
(as often as necessary to remove soil & to prevent cross-contamination when changing tasks).
4. When switching between working with raw food and working with Ready-To-Eat food.
5. Before putting on gloves for working with food or clean equipment and between glove changes.
6. After engaging in other activities that contaminate the hands.

Good food hygiene requires the sourcing of safe food. In certain circumstances, unsafe food will always remain unsafe regardless of the measures taken. Hence it is important that we engage with reliable and recommended vendors to supply safe provisions.

* STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY *

Prevention Of Food Poisoning!!! 

Drawing attention to the recent unfortunate mass food poisoning onboard couple of vessels, leading to fatal deaths. This broadcast is to reiterate the importance of maintaining food safety on board and more importantly “always”.
Good food hygiene is more than cleanliness; it requires food to be protected from the risk of harmful contamination by bacteria, chemicals, and other foreign bodies from the point of delivery to point of consumption. Food must be protected against all forms of bad bacterial contamination. Hence, maintaining high standards of personal cleanliness and food safety is a must to start with. Any existing bacteria already in the food must be prevented from growing to dangerous levels. Most bacteria can be destroyed by thorough cooking (except pre-formed toxins).

To reduce the risk of food poisoning, the following control measures to be in place:

  • Personal hygiene.
  • Temperature control (keep food hot >63°C or cold <5°C).
  •  Segregation of raw and cooked foods.
  • Ensuring no risk of cross-contamination via hands, clothes, etc.
  •  Thorough cooking (cook to 70 Celsius for minimum 15 seconds).
food1

To help stop bacteria from growing, please ensure the following:

  •  When the label says, ‘keep refrigerated’, food must be stored in the fridge.
  •  Food should be cooked as near as possible to the time of meal service.
  •  Raw food must always be kept apart from cooked food.
  •  Separate refrigerators should be used for this purpose.
  •  All food in the refrigerator should be wrapped to prevent cross-contamination (SS container with lid/cling film/silver foil).
  •  Raw food (that often contains pathogenic bacteria) to be wrapped and placed at the bottom of the refrigerator (below-cooked food).
  •  Food should always be subjected to the least possible handling and full use is to be made of serving implements (tongs/spoons/ladles/food gloves).
  • Prepared dishes, such as meat, desserts with milk, egg, or cream ingredients must always be cooled as quickly as possible, covered, and refrigerated.
  • Food for cooking or service is to be covered and stowed in a refrigerator.
  • Butter and conserves for table use are to be similarly protected.
  • Flies and insects are carriers of disease and exposed food provides a serious threat to health. Newspaper / printed papers must not be used for food wrapping. Only grease-proof paper or a suitable food wrap should be used.
  • Food, when being transported, must be suitably covered. The suitable head covering must be always worn when working in a food preparation area/galley (head has the maximum bacteria on a person).
  • All fruit and salad items are to be thoroughly rinsed in freshwater prior to issue.
  • All dry provisions are to be stored in sealed bags or containers. This helps to keep them fresh and stops anything falling into the food by accident.
  • Do not store food items near cleaning chemicals (chemical contamination).
  • Do not use food containers to store cleaning chemicals or non-food for food.
  • Do not reuse plastic water bottles unless they are certified for the same.
  • Do not place or store food on the floor (even inside the storerooms/freezer), this will lead to contamination through pests or dirty liquids.
  • Maintain the required temperatures in all the storerooms.

Personal Hygiene

  • It is essential for food handlers to strictly practice high standards of personal cleanliness. They should be clean and tidy and wear suitable light-colored protective clothing.
  • There must be adequate hand washbasins with soap and drying facilities. Disposable towels or a hot air dryer only must be used and NOT a cloth towel (shared towels cause cross-contamination).
iStock_000021655524_Large-a2de642

Hands and Arms Clean:

  •  Cleaning Procedures: Clean hands and exposed portions of your arms with a hand wash liquid by vigorously rubbing together for at least 20 seconds and thoroughly rinsing with clean water. Pay more attention to the areas underneath the fingernails and between the fingers.
  • When to Wash Hands: Clean your hands and exposed portions of your arms immediately before starting any kind of food preparation, including working with exposed food, clean equipment, and utensils.
  1. After touching bare human body parts other than clean hands and clean exposed portions of arms. After using the toilet/restroom.
  2. After coughing, sneezing, using a handkerchief or disposable tissue, using tobacco, eating, or drinking.
  3. After handling soiled equipment or utensils. During food preparation
    (as often as necessary to remove soil &amp; to prevent cross-contamination when changing tasks).
  4. When switching between working with raw food and working with Ready-To-Eat food.
  5. Before putting on gloves for working with food or clean equipment and between glove changes.
  6. After engaging in other activities that contaminate the hands.

Good food hygiene requires the sourcing of safe food. In certain circumstances, unsafe food will always remain unsafe regardless of the measures taken. Hence it is important that we engage with reliable and recommended vendors to supply safe provisions.

* STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY *

reducing food wastage
catering services

Best Ways To Reducing Wastage Of Food

Reducing Wastage Of Food

Why it is so Important to Reduce Food Waste?
When we waste food, we also waste all the energy and water it takes to grow, harvest, transport, and package.  By reducing our waste, we are conserving our limited natural resources. By taking steps to reduce our energy intake, we contribute to a healthier and happier world. Waste reduction plans do not need to be costly or time-consuming to
practice. Below are a few simple ways to practice …

reducing food wastage

1. Avoid over-ordering provisions. 

Ensure that you only order the items that you need (60 days of dry and frozen items and 30 days of fresh vegetables and fruits). It can be tempting to ‘stock up’ if you are in an economical port, but over-stocking can leave you with more food than you need. And this food will only go to waste if it is left to spoil in galley storerooms.

2. Store food correctly.

Make sure that your vegetable store and deep freezers are running at the right temperatures, ensure that low-risk foods are always stored on higher shelves than high-risk foods, and keep food storage areas are clean and tidy. Storing foods under the correct conditions is very important for preserving their quality and preventing harmful bacterial growth – both of which can quickly lead to food spoilage (waste).

3. Practise stock rotation regularly.

Use the ‘FIFO’ rule – First In, First Out – when storing food (items with no expiry date). This ensures that newer stock is routinely placed behind the older stock, and the older stock will always be used up first before it gets spoiled. For items with expiry dates, use the ‘FEFO’ rule – First Expiry, First Out. Store items based on their expiry date to ensure it is used up in time.

4. Temperature control.

Good temperature control is essential for food safety as it prevents the growth of harmful pathogenic bacteria. It also means that food waste is less likely as the food is kept fresh. This includes cooling hot food quickly, reheating food to the correct core temperature (at least 70°C for 2 minutes), storing high-risk food in fridges (1- 4°C) and freezers (below – 18°C), plus hot/cold holding at safe temperatures (above 63°C (buffet counter) and below 8°C, respectively).

5. Label Food correctly.

If foods are decanted into different containers for storage, then make sure they are clearly labeled with packing date, expiry date, and product details. Keeping stock organized makes it much easier to keep track of what you have and what needs to be used soon, avoiding unlabelled containers being thrown away by mistake or do not know what is in them.

6. Keep a stock inventory.

To prevent waste, you should always know exactly which items you always have in stock. This means keeping a detailed list of the items in all the storerooms, including their expiry /best-before dates, to refer to. This avoids foods getting forgotten and going to waste.

7. Inspect all deliveries against the order specification.

When a provisions delivery arrives at your vessel, it is important that you only accept the items that you have ordered to prevent excess stock. You should also reject anything with visible spoilage or damage in packaging, or anything delivered at an incorrect storage temperature, as these foods will only spoil further and be condemned later.

8. Anticipate the demand with care.

Calculate and plan about how much bulk food you will need to prepare for the crew – can any of this be made to order instead (eggs, rotis, dosa, etc). Whilst bulk cooking may save time, it can be a waste of both money and food if not planned well and consumed in time.

9. Incorporate leftovers and use food efficiently.

Try not to be so quick to throw away leftover food items, as you might be able to make use of them somewhere else. For example, vegetable peelings and animal bones can be used to make stocks and soups, while day-old bread can be made into croutons or breadcrumbs.

* MAKING VOYAGES MEMORABLE *

Scorpiomarine.com

Reducing Wastage Of Food

Why it is so Important to Reduce Food Waste?

When we waste food, we also waste all the energy and water it takes to grow, harvest, transport, and package.  By reducing our waste, we are conserving our limited natural resources. By taking steps to reduce our energy intake, we contribute to a healthier and happier world. Waste reduction plans do not need to be costly or time-consuming to
practice. Below are a few simple ways to practice …

1. Avoid over-ordering provisions.

Ensure that you only order the items that you need (60 days of dry and frozen items and 30 days of fresh vegetables and fruits). It can be tempting to ‘stock up’ if you are in an economical port, but over-stocking can leave you with more food than you need. And this food will only go to waste if it is left to spoil in galley storerooms.

Frozen-food-in-containers

2. Store food correctly.

Make sure that your vegetable store and deep freezers are running at the right temperatures, ensure that low-risk foods are always stored on higher shelves than high-risk foods, and keep food storage areas are clean and tidy. Storing foods under the correct conditions is very important for preserving their quality and preventing harmful bacterial growth – both of which can quickly lead to food spoilage (waste).

3. Practise stock rotation regularly.

Use the ‘FIFO’ rule – First In, First Out – when storing food (items with no expiry date). This ensures that newer stock is routinely placed behind the older stock, and the older stock will always be used up first before it gets spoiled. For items with expiry dates, use the ‘FEFO’ rule – First Expiry, First Out. Store items based on their expiry date to ensure it is used up in time.

large
Thermapen-Food-Safety

4. Temperature control.

Good temperature control is essential for food safety as it prevents the growth of harmful pathogenic bacteria. It also means that food waste is less likely as the food is kept fresh. This includes cooling hot food quickly, reheating food to the correct core temperature (at least 70°C for 2 minutes), storing high-risk food in fridges (1- 4°C) and freezers (below – 18°C), plus hot/cold holding at safe temperatures (above 63°C (buffet counter) and below 8°C, respectively).

5. Label Food correctly.

If foods are decanted into different containers for storage, then make sure they are clearly labeled with packing date, expiry date, and product details. Keeping stock organized makes it much easier to keep track of what you have and what needs to be used soon, avoiding unlabelled containers being thrown away by mistake or do not know what is in them.

woman-doing-stock-count.jpg-628x419

6. Keep a stock inventory.

To prevent waste, you should always know exactly which items you always have in stock. This means keeping a detailed list of the items in all the storerooms, including their expiry /best-before dates, to refer to. This avoids foods getting forgotten and going to waste.

7. Inspect all deliveries against the order specification.

When a provisions delivery arrives at your vessel, it is important that you only accept the items that you have ordered to prevent excess stock. You should also reject anything with visible spoilage or damage in packaging, or anything delivered at an incorrect storage temperature, as these foods will only spoil further and be condemned later.

11
people group catering buffet food indoor in luxury restaurant with meat colorful fruits and vegetables

8. Anticipate the demand with care.

Calculate and plan about how much bulk food you will need to prepare for the crew – can any of this be made to order instead (eggs, rotis, dosa, etc). Whilst bulk cooking may save time, it can be a waste of both money and food if not planned well and consumed in time.

9. Incorporate leftovers and use food efficiently.

Try not to be so quick to throw away leftover food items, as you might be able to make use of them somewhere else. For example, vegetable peelings and animal bones can be used to make stocks and soups, while day-old bread can be made into croutons or breadcrumbs.

22

* MAKING VOYAGES MEMORABLE *

Scorpiomarine.com