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catering services, Marine Catering, Ship Provisions Supply

Good Inventory Practices

Good Inventory Practices

Having an efficient Inventory process is very important to plan a healthy menu in advance, and to maintain a seamless purchase cycle. It is equally important to constantly upgrade, adapt and streamline our in-house inventory operations to meet the current demands. As we all have experienced, it is very easy to slip into bad habits, inefficient practices, and land with a high cost of inventory.

By following few good practices, we will be able to maintain dynamic and efficient inventory data. The goal is to find the ideal inventory sweet spot – where we maintain the lowest possible inventory levels without being understocked. Inventory should not be too much or too little, both situations are bad for the vessel.

good inventory practices

Here are a few Inventory Management best practices that will help in many ways …

1. Updated Product information like average cost, popular countries, shelf life, is it seasonal, is it hard to procure in the port of call, etc. helps to plan purchase.
2. Make an ABC list of items based on the importance (most important to least)
A- items are the highest priority stock and require regular monthly reordering.
B- items are valuable, medium-priority stock and usually require quarterly reordering.
C- items are low-priority stock and require minimal reordering.

3. Organise the stock in the storeroom according to how often the items are used, will help in optimising storage space, streamline ordering and clear clutter for ease in counting.

4. Simplify the stores' issue process. Here are few ways to follow …

  • Finalise the menu (based on the stock availability, crew preference, and other factors)
  • List out the items required for that day’s cooking on a notepad (do not go by memory).
  • Use an empty crate/basket to collect all these items (separate basket for each store).
  • Double-check each item for accuracy before taking the basket to the galley.
  • Try and reduce the number of trips to the storeroom through preplanning.

5. Chart out a ROL for critical/essential items (Re-Order Level)

  • Based on the daily consumption quantity and the average number of days between receiving provision deliveries, we can arrive at the ROL.
  • ROL= (Average daily consumption X Average days between provisions supply) + Safety Stock
  • ROL: A Reorder level tells us approximately when to order more stock (since we have reached the lowest amount of inventory to sustain before we need more).
  • When an item is reaching reorder level, make a note in for inclusion in the next order.

6. Streamline the Inventory Stocktake to mitigate the possibility of costly mistakes.

  • Schedule stocktakes to reduce the impact on galley operations.
  • Clean and organize the storerooms before performing the Stocktake.
  • Know what stocks are being counted and how is it being counted.
  • Open and count absolutely everything – no guesswork allowed.

7. Reduce the dead Inventory. Normally, most vessels would have 45 to 60 days of safety stock, maybe a value of 10 to 12K. Sometimes the vessel may be carrying excess stocks of few items that may not be required for the current crew mix / would have been excess ordered by error / received during vessel take over etc. It is important to identify and plan to effectively use or transfer these items before they expire or spoil.

8. Follow FIFO or FEFO. Use the ‘FIFO’ rule – First In, First Out – when storing food (items with no expiry date). This ensures that newer stock is routinely placed behind an older stock, and the older stock will always be used up first before it gets spoiled. For items with an expiry date, use the ‘FEFO’ rule – First Expiry, First Out. Store items based on their expiry date to ensure it is used up in time.

9. Audit your inventory. Regardless of how often the inventory is taken, we should get an external member to be part of the physically counting once a quarter. This regular exercise will ensure the physical stock matches with official records. An audit helps us to identify the gaps in time, to take appropriate corrective actions.

       * STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY *

Good Inventory Practices

Having an efficient Inventory process is very important to plan a healthy menu in advance, and to maintain a seamless purchase cycle. It is equally important to constantly upgrade, adapt and streamline our in-house inventory operations to meet the current demands. As we all have experienced, it is very easy to slip into bad habits, inefficient practices, and land with a high cost of inventory.

By following few good practices, we will be able to maintain dynamic and efficient inventory data. The goal is to find the ideal inventory sweet spot – where we maintain the lowest possible inventory levels without being understocked. Inventory should not be too much or too little, both situations are bad for the vessel.

Here are a few Inventory Management best practices that will help in many ways …

1. Updated Product information like average cost, popular countries, shelf life, is it seasonal, is it hard to procure in the port of call, etc. helps to plan purchase.

supermarket-grocery-prices

2. Make an ABC list of items based on the importance (most important to least)

  • A-items are the highest priority stock and require regular monthly reordering.
  • B- items are valuable, medium-priority stock and usually require quarterly reordering.
  • C-items are low-priority stock and require minimal reordering.

3. Organise the stock in the storeroom according to how often the items are used, will help in optimising storage space, streamline ordering and clear clutter for ease in counting.

4. Simplify the stores & issue process. Here are few ways to follow …

  • Finalise the menu (based on the stock availability, crew preference, and other factors)
  • List out the items required for that day’s cooking on a notepad (do not go by memory).
  • Use an empty crate/basket to collect all these items (separate basket for each store).
  • Double-check each item for accuracy before taking the basket to the galley.
  • Try and reduce the number of trips to the storeroom through preplanning.

5. Chart out a ROL for critical/essential items (Re- Order Level)

  • Based on the daily consumption quantity and the average number of days between receiving provision deliveries, we can arrive at the ROL.
  • ROL= (Average daily consumption X Average days between provisions supply) + Safety Stock
  • ROL: A Reorder level tells us approximately when to order more stock (since we have reached the lowest amount of inventory to sustain before we need more).
  • When an item is reaching reorder level, make a note in for inclusion in the next order.

6. Streamline the Inventory Stocktake to mitigate the possibility of costly mistakes.

  • Schedule stock takes to reduce the impact on galley operations.
  • Clean and organize the storerooms before performing the Stocktake.
  • Know what stocks are being counted and how is it being counted.
  • Open and count absolutely everything – no guesswork allowed.

7. Reduce the dead Inventory. Normally, most vessels would have 45 to 60 days of safety stock, maybe a value of 10 to 12K. Sometimes the vessel may be carrying excess stocks of few items that may not be required for the current crew mix / would have been excess ordered by error / received during vessel take over etc. It is important to identify and plan to effectively use or transfer these items before they expire or spoil.

8. Follow FIFO or FEFO. Use the ‘FIFO’ rule – First In, First Out – when storing food (items with no expiry date). This ensures that newer stock is routinely placed behind an older stock, and the older stock will always be used up first before it gets spoiled. For items with an expiry date, use the ‘FEFO’ rule – First Expiry, First Out. Store items based on their expiry date to ensure it is used up in time.

9. Audit your inventory. Regardless of how often the inventory is taken, we should get an external member to be part of the physically counting once a quarter. This regular exercise will ensure the physical stock matches with official records. An audit helps us to identify the gaps in time, to take appropriate corrective actions.

* STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY *

prevention of food poisoning
catering services, Food Safety

Prevention Of Food Poisoning

Prevention Of Food Poisoning!!! 

Drawing attention to the recent unfortunate mass food poisoning onboard couple of vessels, leading to fatal deaths. This broadcast is to reiterate the importance of maintaining food safety on board and more importantly “always”.
Good food hygiene is more than cleanliness; it requires food to be protected from the risk of harmful contamination by bacteria, chemicals, and other foreign bodies from the point of delivery to point of consumption. Food must be protected against all forms of bad bacterial contamination. Hence, maintaining high standards of personal cleanliness and food safety is a must to start with. Any existing bacteria already in the food must be prevented from growing to dangerous levels. Most bacteria can be destroyed by thorough cooking (except pre-formed toxins).

prevention of food poisoningTo reduce the risk of food poisoning, the following control measures to be in place:

  • Personal hygiene.
  • Temperature control (keep food hot >63°C or cold <5°C).
  •  Segregation of raw and cooked foods.
  • Ensuring no risk of cross-contamination via hands, clothes, etc.
  •  Thorough cooking (cook to 70 Celsius for minimum 15 seconds).

To help stop bacteria from growing, please ensure the following:

  •  When the label says, ' keep refrigerated ' food must be stored in the fridge.
  •  Food should be cooked as near as possible to the time of meal service.
  •  Raw food must always be kept apart from cooked food.
  •  Separate refrigerators should be used for this purpose.
  •  All food in the refrigerator should be wrapped to prevent cross-contamination (SS container with lid/cling film/silver foil).
  •  Raw food (that often contains pathogenic bacteria) to be wrapped and placed at the bottom of the refrigerator (below-cooked food).
  •  Food should always be subjected to the least possible handling and full use is to be made of serving implements (tongs/spoons/ladles/food gloves).
  • Prepared dishes, such as meat, desserts with milk, egg, or cream ingredients must always be cooled as quickly as possible, covered, and refrigerated.
  • Food for cooking or service is to be covered and stowed in a refrigerator.
  • Butter and conserves for table use are to be similarly protected.
  • Flies and insects are carriers of disease and exposed food provides a serious threat to health. Newspaper / printed papers must not be used for food wrapping. Only grease-proof paper or a suitable food wrap should be used.
  • Food, when being transported, must be suitably covered. The suitable head covering must be always worn when working in a food preparation area/galley (head has the maximum bacteria on a person).
  • All fruit and salad items are to be thoroughly rinsed in freshwater prior to issue.
  • All dry provisions are to be stored in sealed bags or containers. This helps to keep them fresh and stops anything falling into the food by accident.
  • Do not store food items near cleaning chemicals (chemical contamination).
  • Do not use food containers to store cleaning chemicals or non-food for food.
  • Do not reuse plastic water bottles unless they are certified for the same.
  • Do not place or store food on the floor (even inside the storerooms/freezer), this will lead to contamination through pests or dirty liquids.
  • Maintain the required temperatures in all the storerooms.

Personal Hygiene

  • It is essential for food handlers to strictly practice high standards of personal cleanliness. They should be clean and tidy and wear suitable light-colored protective clothing.
  • There must be adequate hand washbasins with soap and drying facilities. Disposable towels or a hot air dryer only must be used and NOT a cloth towel (shared towels cause cross-contamination).

Hands and Arms Clean:

  •  Cleaning Procedures: Clean hands and exposed portions of your arms with a hand wash liquid by vigorously rubbing together for at least 20 seconds and thoroughly rinsing with clean water. Pay more attention to the areas underneath the fingernails and between the fingers.
  • When to Wash Hands: Clean your hands and exposed portions of your arms immediately before starting any kind of food preparation, including working with exposed food, clean equipment, and utensils.

1. After touching bare human body parts other than clean hands and clean exposed portions of arms. After using the toilet/restroom.
2. After coughing, sneezing, using a handkerchief or disposable tissue, using tobacco, eating, or drinking.
3. After handling soiled equipment or utensils. During food preparation
(as often as necessary to remove soil & to prevent cross-contamination when changing tasks).
4. When switching between working with raw food and working with Ready-To-Eat food.
5. Before putting on gloves for working with food or clean equipment and between glove changes.
6. After engaging in other activities that contaminate the hands.

Good food hygiene requires the sourcing of safe food. In certain circumstances, unsafe food will always remain unsafe regardless of the measures taken. Hence it is important that we engage with reliable and recommended vendors to supply safe provisions.

* STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY *

Prevention Of Food Poisoning!!! 

Drawing attention to the recent unfortunate mass food poisoning onboard couple of vessels, leading to fatal deaths. This broadcast is to reiterate the importance of maintaining food safety on board and more importantly “always”.
Good food hygiene is more than cleanliness; it requires food to be protected from the risk of harmful contamination by bacteria, chemicals, and other foreign bodies from the point of delivery to point of consumption. Food must be protected against all forms of bad bacterial contamination. Hence, maintaining high standards of personal cleanliness and food safety is a must to start with. Any existing bacteria already in the food must be prevented from growing to dangerous levels. Most bacteria can be destroyed by thorough cooking (except pre-formed toxins).

To reduce the risk of food poisoning, the following control measures to be in place:

  • Personal hygiene.
  • Temperature control (keep food hot >63°C or cold <5°C).
  •  Segregation of raw and cooked foods.
  • Ensuring no risk of cross-contamination via hands, clothes, etc.
  •  Thorough cooking (cook to 70 Celsius for minimum 15 seconds).
food1

To help stop bacteria from growing, please ensure the following:

  •  When the label says, ‘keep refrigerated’, food must be stored in the fridge.
  •  Food should be cooked as near as possible to the time of meal service.
  •  Raw food must always be kept apart from cooked food.
  •  Separate refrigerators should be used for this purpose.
  •  All food in the refrigerator should be wrapped to prevent cross-contamination (SS container with lid/cling film/silver foil).
  •  Raw food (that often contains pathogenic bacteria) to be wrapped and placed at the bottom of the refrigerator (below-cooked food).
  •  Food should always be subjected to the least possible handling and full use is to be made of serving implements (tongs/spoons/ladles/food gloves).
  • Prepared dishes, such as meat, desserts with milk, egg, or cream ingredients must always be cooled as quickly as possible, covered, and refrigerated.
  • Food for cooking or service is to be covered and stowed in a refrigerator.
  • Butter and conserves for table use are to be similarly protected.
  • Flies and insects are carriers of disease and exposed food provides a serious threat to health. Newspaper / printed papers must not be used for food wrapping. Only grease-proof paper or a suitable food wrap should be used.
  • Food, when being transported, must be suitably covered. The suitable head covering must be always worn when working in a food preparation area/galley (head has the maximum bacteria on a person).
  • All fruit and salad items are to be thoroughly rinsed in freshwater prior to issue.
  • All dry provisions are to be stored in sealed bags or containers. This helps to keep them fresh and stops anything falling into the food by accident.
  • Do not store food items near cleaning chemicals (chemical contamination).
  • Do not use food containers to store cleaning chemicals or non-food for food.
  • Do not reuse plastic water bottles unless they are certified for the same.
  • Do not place or store food on the floor (even inside the storerooms/freezer), this will lead to contamination through pests or dirty liquids.
  • Maintain the required temperatures in all the storerooms.

Personal Hygiene

  • It is essential for food handlers to strictly practice high standards of personal cleanliness. They should be clean and tidy and wear suitable light-colored protective clothing.
  • There must be adequate hand washbasins with soap and drying facilities. Disposable towels or a hot air dryer only must be used and NOT a cloth towel (shared towels cause cross-contamination).
iStock_000021655524_Large-a2de642

Hands and Arms Clean:

  •  Cleaning Procedures: Clean hands and exposed portions of your arms with a hand wash liquid by vigorously rubbing together for at least 20 seconds and thoroughly rinsing with clean water. Pay more attention to the areas underneath the fingernails and between the fingers.
  • When to Wash Hands: Clean your hands and exposed portions of your arms immediately before starting any kind of food preparation, including working with exposed food, clean equipment, and utensils.
  1. After touching bare human body parts other than clean hands and clean exposed portions of arms. After using the toilet/restroom.
  2. After coughing, sneezing, using a handkerchief or disposable tissue, using tobacco, eating, or drinking.
  3. After handling soiled equipment or utensils. During food preparation
    (as often as necessary to remove soil &amp; to prevent cross-contamination when changing tasks).
  4. When switching between working with raw food and working with Ready-To-Eat food.
  5. Before putting on gloves for working with food or clean equipment and between glove changes.
  6. After engaging in other activities that contaminate the hands.

Good food hygiene requires the sourcing of safe food. In certain circumstances, unsafe food will always remain unsafe regardless of the measures taken. Hence it is important that we engage with reliable and recommended vendors to supply safe provisions.

* STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY *

reducing food wastage
catering services

Best Ways To Reducing Wastage Of Food

Reducing Wastage Of Food

Why it is so Important to Reduce Food Waste?
When we waste food, we also waste all the energy and water it takes to grow, harvest, transport, and package.  By reducing our waste, we are conserving our limited natural resources. By taking steps to reduce our energy intake, we contribute to a healthier and happier world. Waste reduction plans do not need to be costly or time-consuming to
practice. Below are a few simple ways to practice …

reducing food wastage

1. Avoid over-ordering provisions. 

Ensure that you only order the items that you need (60 days of dry and frozen items and 30 days of fresh vegetables and fruits). It can be tempting to ‘stock up’ if you are in an economical port, but over-stocking can leave you with more food than you need. And this food will only go to waste if it is left to spoil in galley storerooms.

2. Store food correctly.

Make sure that your vegetable store and deep freezers are running at the right temperatures, ensure that low-risk foods are always stored on higher shelves than high-risk foods, and keep food storage areas are clean and tidy. Storing foods under the correct conditions is very important for preserving their quality and preventing harmful bacterial growth – both of which can quickly lead to food spoilage (waste).

3. Practise stock rotation regularly.

Use the ‘FIFO’ rule – First In, First Out – when storing food (items with no expiry date). This ensures that newer stock is routinely placed behind the older stock, and the older stock will always be used up first before it gets spoiled. For items with expiry dates, use the ‘FEFO’ rule – First Expiry, First Out. Store items based on their expiry date to ensure it is used up in time.

4. Temperature control.

Good temperature control is essential for food safety as it prevents the growth of harmful pathogenic bacteria. It also means that food waste is less likely as the food is kept fresh. This includes cooling hot food quickly, reheating food to the correct core temperature (at least 70°C for 2 minutes), storing high-risk food in fridges (1- 4°C) and freezers (below – 18°C), plus hot/cold holding at safe temperatures (above 63°C (buffet counter) and below 8°C, respectively).

5. Label Food correctly.

If foods are decanted into different containers for storage, then make sure they are clearly labeled with packing date, expiry date, and product details. Keeping stock organized makes it much easier to keep track of what you have and what needs to be used soon, avoiding unlabelled containers being thrown away by mistake or do not know what is in them.

6. Keep a stock inventory.

To prevent waste, you should always know exactly which items you always have in stock. This means keeping a detailed list of the items in all the storerooms, including their expiry /best-before dates, to refer to. This avoids foods getting forgotten and going to waste.

7. Inspect all deliveries against the order specification.

When a provisions delivery arrives at your vessel, it is important that you only accept the items that you have ordered to prevent excess stock. You should also reject anything with visible spoilage or damage in packaging, or anything delivered at an incorrect storage temperature, as these foods will only spoil further and be condemned later.

8. Anticipate the demand with care.

Calculate and plan about how much bulk food you will need to prepare for the crew – can any of this be made to order instead (eggs, rotis, dosa, etc). Whilst bulk cooking may save time, it can be a waste of both money and food if not planned well and consumed in time.

9. Incorporate leftovers and use food efficiently.

Try not to be so quick to throw away leftover food items, as you might be able to make use of them somewhere else. For example, vegetable peelings and animal bones can be used to make stocks and soups, while day-old bread can be made into croutons or breadcrumbs.

* MAKING VOYAGES MEMORABLE *

Scorpiomarine.com

Reducing Wastage Of Food

Why it is so Important to Reduce Food Waste?

When we waste food, we also waste all the energy and water it takes to grow, harvest, transport, and package.  By reducing our waste, we are conserving our limited natural resources. By taking steps to reduce our energy intake, we contribute to a healthier and happier world. Waste reduction plans do not need to be costly or time-consuming to
practice. Below are a few simple ways to practice …

1. Avoid over-ordering provisions.

Ensure that you only order the items that you need (60 days of dry and frozen items and 30 days of fresh vegetables and fruits). It can be tempting to ‘stock up’ if you are in an economical port, but over-stocking can leave you with more food than you need. And this food will only go to waste if it is left to spoil in galley storerooms.

Frozen-food-in-containers

2. Store food correctly.

Make sure that your vegetable store and deep freezers are running at the right temperatures, ensure that low-risk foods are always stored on higher shelves than high-risk foods, and keep food storage areas are clean and tidy. Storing foods under the correct conditions is very important for preserving their quality and preventing harmful bacterial growth – both of which can quickly lead to food spoilage (waste).

3. Practise stock rotation regularly.

Use the ‘FIFO’ rule – First In, First Out – when storing food (items with no expiry date). This ensures that newer stock is routinely placed behind the older stock, and the older stock will always be used up first before it gets spoiled. For items with expiry dates, use the ‘FEFO’ rule – First Expiry, First Out. Store items based on their expiry date to ensure it is used up in time.

large
Thermapen-Food-Safety

4. Temperature control.

Good temperature control is essential for food safety as it prevents the growth of harmful pathogenic bacteria. It also means that food waste is less likely as the food is kept fresh. This includes cooling hot food quickly, reheating food to the correct core temperature (at least 70°C for 2 minutes), storing high-risk food in fridges (1- 4°C) and freezers (below – 18°C), plus hot/cold holding at safe temperatures (above 63°C (buffet counter) and below 8°C, respectively).

5. Label Food correctly.

If foods are decanted into different containers for storage, then make sure they are clearly labeled with packing date, expiry date, and product details. Keeping stock organized makes it much easier to keep track of what you have and what needs to be used soon, avoiding unlabelled containers being thrown away by mistake or do not know what is in them.

woman-doing-stock-count.jpg-628x419

6. Keep a stock inventory.

To prevent waste, you should always know exactly which items you always have in stock. This means keeping a detailed list of the items in all the storerooms, including their expiry /best-before dates, to refer to. This avoids foods getting forgotten and going to waste.

7. Inspect all deliveries against the order specification.

When a provisions delivery arrives at your vessel, it is important that you only accept the items that you have ordered to prevent excess stock. You should also reject anything with visible spoilage or damage in packaging, or anything delivered at an incorrect storage temperature, as these foods will only spoil further and be condemned later.

11
people group catering buffet food indoor in luxury restaurant with meat colorful fruits and vegetables

8. Anticipate the demand with care.

Calculate and plan about how much bulk food you will need to prepare for the crew – can any of this be made to order instead (eggs, rotis, dosa, etc). Whilst bulk cooking may save time, it can be a waste of both money and food if not planned well and consumed in time.

9. Incorporate leftovers and use food efficiently.

Try not to be so quick to throw away leftover food items, as you might be able to make use of them somewhere else. For example, vegetable peelings and animal bones can be used to make stocks and soups, while day-old bread can be made into croutons or breadcrumbs.

22

* MAKING VOYAGES MEMORABLE *

Scorpiomarine.com

catering services, Food Safety, Marine Catering

Menu Planning

Menu planning is the pivot of the food preparation operations in the marine industry. It is an advance plan of a dietary pattern, over a given period. The Menu is the summary of food dishes, designed to fulfil the nutritional needs of the crew. It is planned with a lot of care, keeping in mind the needs of the crew and what the galley can cater to. The biggest advantage of a well-planned menu is that it leads to crew wellbeing and satisfaction. It also helps to motivate the galley team for responsible and successful food service.

menu planningThe aim of menu planning is to:
• Meet nutritional needs – (Food is part of medical therapy)
• Provide attractive, appetizing meals
• Simplify purchase, preparation, and storage of meals
• Plan meals within the food budget
• Meet/exceed crew expectations
• Provide quality, standardization & predictability

Menu planning is one of the important activities of galley operations executed by the Food Committee and the chief cook. Menu planning calls for careful thought on many factors that would determine success.

Menu planning

Menu planning is the pivot of the food preparation operations in the marine industry. It is an advance plan of a dietary pattern, over a given period. The Menu is the summary of food dishes, designed to fulfil the nutritional needs of the crew. It is planned with a lot of care, keeping in mind the needs of the crew and what the galley can cater to. The biggest advantage of a well-planned menu is that it leads to crew wellbeing and satisfaction. It also helps to motivate the galley team for responsible and successful food service.

ess

The aim of menu planning is to:

  •  Meet nutritional needs – (Food is part of medical therapy).
  • Provide attractive, appetizing meals.
  •  Simplify purchase, preparation, and storage of meals.
  • Plan meals within the food budget.
  • Meet/exceed crew expectations.
  • Provide quality, standardization & predictability.

Menu planning is one of the important activities of galley operations executed by the Food Committee and the chief cook. Menu planning calls for careful thought on many factors that would determine success.

Factors to be considered while planning:

  • Stock in hand: Helps to plan the menu in accordance with storeroom availability.
  • Events and celebrations: Plan menu for the upcoming events first, and then the rest of
    the menu period accordingly.
  • Balanced Diet: To build a healthy meal, divide your dish into equal parts of lean
    protein, complex carbohydrates, and fibrous veggies.
  • Colour: Plan multiple colour combinations to break the monotony.
  • Cooking method: Use multiple cooking methods in a meal (boil, fry, bake, sauté etc).
  • Service time: Start and end time of the meal should be considered.
  • Production process: The type of production process implemented, such as traditional
    cook serve, centralized production, cook-chill, cook-freeze, etc, should be considered.
  • Convenience products: Whether full or part readymade items to be included.
  • Style of service: Consider the service style (regular sit-down buffet or party night).
  • Crew Expectations: Consider feedbacks and suggestions to incorporate them.

* STAY SAFE STAY HEALTHY *

  • Stock in hand: Helps to plan the menu in accordance with storeroom availability.
  • Events and celebrations: Plan menu for the upcoming events first, and then the rest of
    the menu period accordingly.
  • Balanced Diet: To build a healthy meal, divide your dish into equal parts of lean
    protein, complex carbohydrates, and fibrous veggies.
  • Colour: Plan multiple colour combinations to break the monotony.
  • Cooking method: Use multiple cooking methods in a meal (boil, fry, bake, sauté etc).
  • Service time: Start and end time of the meal should be considered.
  • Production process: The type of production process implemented, such as traditional
    cook serve, centralized production, cook-chill, cook-freeze, etc, should be considered.
  • Convenience products: Whether full or part readymade items to be included.
  • Style of service: Consider the service style (regular sit-down buffet or party night).
  • Crew Expectations: Consider feedbacks and suggestions to incorporate them.

For cost-effective, fresh, healthy and wholesome offshore catering services, choose Scorpio Marine every time.

catering services, Company, Food Safety, Marine Catering

International Chef Day – Photo & Video contest – 2021

We are  thrilled  to announce  the winners  of the second edition of our “International Chef Day” contest.

The primary  aim  of the  contest was to recognise  the  contribution  of  our  galley teams, that through their skill, passion and hard work, add so much flavour to life at sea. We asked our chefs at sea to show us glimpses of their culinary skills by preparing innovative, presentable, and flavourful dishes through photos and videos.

We received almost 400 entries for the contest, and we thank each one of you for taking out the time from your busy schedules on board to send them across. We shared a few of the photographs on social media too and received an overwhelming response. After the contest closed on 18th October, the entries were reviewed and shortlisted by Mr Deva Senapathy, from Scorpio Marine Services, a Hospitality graduate with 30 years of varied experience in Luxury hotels, Catering Institutes, Cruise Liners, Corporate Administration and Human Resources.

chef16

Around the World

 (Theme : Make our audience travel around the world through the best of the best food delicacies.

Prepare the main course or a type of street food and send us a photo that would transport us to the country of its origin. It can be any cuisine of your choice.)

chef11
chef12

Winner

Chief Cook Satbir Singh – Berge Weisshorn (Cash prize of 500 USD) for preparing an elaborate Italian feast of nibbles, starters and mains from one of the world’s most popular cuisines.

Runners up

  • 1st Runner up – Chief Cook Jasimuddin Ahammed – AYOE (Cash prize of 300 USD) for transporting us to the beaches of Sri Lanka with his delicious Sri Lankan fish roast.
  • 2nd Runner up – Chief Cook Hari Vengadapathy – BW Lord (Cash prize of 300 USD) for tantalising the taste buds of all seafood lovers with his lobster tandoori.

Clean Eats

(Theme : With everyone trying to get fit and eat healthy, this theme would be perfect to judge the skills of our chefs on board and challenge them to use their creativity and imagination to prepare a healthy dish without compromising on taste, flavour and presentation).

WhatsApp Image 2021-11-17 at 7.54.29 PM
chef7

Winner

Chief Cook Israf Ali – Kmarin Resolution (Cash prize of 500 USD) for his indulgent yet calorie-conscious ‘devilled eggs’ alongside simple baked potatoes in the very attractive Hasselback fashion.

Runners up

  • 1st Runner up – Chief Cook Ramesh Castro – Kmarin Respect (Cash prize of 300 USD) for his chicken in mole sauce,​ showing us how ​a healthy ​dish can also be presentable and full of flavour.
  • 2nd Runner up – Chief Cook Ansari Mohammad Asif – Nord Skate (Cash prize of 300 USD) for his amazing display of food art with fruits and vegetables available in the kitchen on a daily basis.

Sweet and Sugar

(Theme : Bake or no-bake, you are welcome to prepare any dessert of your choice and share your photos/videos with us. The participant hailed as the master baker should satisfy the judges’ sweet cravings even from a thousand miles away).

chef5
chef14
Doughnuts

Winner

General Steward Ajith Venugopal – Kmarin Respect (Cash prize of 500 USD) for his perfectly layered and exquisitely presented ‘rainbow delight’.

Runners up

  • 1st Runner up – Chief Cook Robert Mata Tano – BW Rye (Cash prize of 300 USD) for his classic and most popular dessert amongst our seafarers, the ‘assorted doughnuts’.
  • 2nd Runner up – Chief Cook Sahaya Arins Micheal Pitchai – Southern Rouse (Cash prize of 300 USD) for his classic French pastry, Mille-Feuille, whose origin dates back hundreds of years.

Congratulations to the winners, runners-up, and everyone who participated and yet again helped make this contest a grand success! We look forward to your participation in the next edition as well.

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International Dessert Day
catering services, Company, Food Safety, Marine Catering

International Dessert Day

Scorpio Marine Services, in collaboration with leading ship manager, Synergy Marine Group, organized a first of its kind photo contest to mark the “International Dessert Day” (14th October 2020) and “International Chefs Day” (20th October 2020). The primary aim of these contests was to recognize the contribution of the galley teams onboard cargo ships, who through their skill, passion, and hard work, add so much flavour to life at sea.

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The contest received an overwhelming response with over 600 photographs from Synergy’s diverse fleet of 400 + vessels. The entries were shortlisted by Scorpio Marine’s General Manager, Mr. Deva Senapathy, a hospitality professional with three decades of varied experience in luxury hotels, catering institutes, and cruise liners. All the winners and runners-up received cash awards sponsored by Scorpio.

We would once again like to thank all the participating galley teams for their tremendous response. The winners and runners-up were as follows:

International Dessert Day

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Winner

  • Chief cook Dionicio Dela Cruz Jr. and the galley team onboard the “Nicoline Bulker”.

Runners up

  • Chief Cook Alexander Gaviola and the galley team onboard the “Nord Columbia”.
  • Chief Cook Rajesh Vaniyan and the galley team onboard the “Nave Pulsar”.
  • Chief Cook HRI Singh and the galley team onboard the “Emerald Express”.
  • Chief Cook Riyaz Mohamad and the galley team onboard the “Sea Duck”.

International Chefs Day

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Winner

  • Chief Cook Hermen Derence and the galley team onboard the “BW Yushi”.

Runners up

  • Chief Cook Derlinson Nazarane and the galley team onboard the “Trammo Cornell”.
  • Chief Cook Madhusoodnan V. Nair and the galley team onboard the “BW Thor”.
  • Chief Cook Byron Boayes and the galley team onboard the “Lowlands Rise”.
  • Chief Cook Don Quijote and the galley team onboard the “Nord Quebec”.

catering services, Food Safety, Marine Catering, Ship Provisions Supply

Importance of Food Safety And Hygiene In Ship’s Galley

galley food safety catering services

Galley Food Safety Catering Services

The “Galley” is the most important part of a sea-going vessel. It is the place where nutritious meals are prepared for the hard-working ship’s crew. Based on the size of the ship, the Galley would be preparing food from 10 to up to few thousands, on large cruise liners, on a day.

The Galley, being the heart of the social fabric, needs to be ensured that the layout, appliances, and safety equipment. These are perfectly aligned to the grueling chores in hand.

A safe, nutritious, and low-fat food provides the seafarers with adequate energy to perform their duties, protect their health and fight any fatigue symptoms. On the other side, if the standard hygiene practices are not handled properly onboard, food can be a major cause of diseases and foodborne outbreaks. Handling the Food Safely is of prime importance within the prevention of food-related problems onboard ships. To begin with, the sourcing of wholesome, healthy, and hygienic raw food items is very important to achieve the required food safety standards.

Galleys, food storerooms, and dining rooms are subject to MLC inspections to ensure seafarer’s health, safety, and welfare is well-taken care of. Hence, it is of prime importance that they are kept in shipshape condition to avoid any food-borne diseases, which can put vessels and crew in danger.

The following are the main risks to food safety in the galley, and service areas:

food safety

  • Biological hazards: (bacteria, viruses, moulds, yeasts, or parasites)

These organisms are commonly related to humans and raw products entering food preparation sites. Therefore, the cooking temperature of food, storage temperature & time, and awareness and execution of hygienic practices by food handlers onboard ships play a very important role in food safety.

 

chemical hazards in food

  • Chemical hazards (e.g., cleaning agents)

Chemical contamination of food may occur unintentionally either during procurement or during food processing. It is important to identify and eliminate the dangers that lurk in every corner.

 

Scorpio Marine makes sure that the food combinations offer all macro and micro-nutrients as per World Health Organization’s recommended nutrient intakes. This helps the seafarers to avoid any deficiency and to be healthy while on board.

Supplying healthy, wholesome, and safe meals on a controlled budget might be hard to achieve, however, SMS’s procurement resources help to provide balanced meals with high-quality ingredients for the crew from day one. Scorpio Marine specializes in supplying high-quality and safe provisions to all types of vessels around the globe (600 ports in 85 countries). Most of our clients are from Greece, Singapore, Norway, South Korea, Germany, UK, Denmark, India, Dubai, Netherlands

For more information on Scorpio Marine galley food safety Catering services, contact scorpiomarine@scorpiomarine.com